object(Publication)#714 (6) { ["_data"]=> array(25) { ["id"]=> int(1674) ["accessStatus"]=> int(0) ["datePublished"]=> string(10) "2017-12-31" ["lastModified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-07 11:31:00" ["sectionId"]=> int(34) ["seq"]=> int(1) ["submissionId"]=> int(1557) ["status"]=> int(3) ["version"]=> int(1) ["categoryIds"]=> array(0) { } ["copyrightYear"]=> int(2020) ["issueId"]=> int(112) ["licenseUrl"]=> string(49) "https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0" ["pages"]=> string(6) "7–20" ["abstract"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> string(1929) "

In the context of increasing numbers of migrants and refugees globally, their successful integration is an important topic for politics and society. Canada is often portrayed as a particularly immigrant-friendly country, not least because of its official Multiculturalism. However, the Canadian migration and integration system is quite distinct in its setup and structures, giving local immigrant-serving organizations a particular framework to operate in. One such initiative is the MRCSSI in London, Ontario. It provides psychological support and networks for Arab Muslim newcomers in order to foster integration and family safety through a culturally integrative approach. Over the past years, the MRCSSI has been very successful in this field, making it an interesting case to be studied as a model of best practice. In order to understand its interrelation with the surrounding system, and thus its adaptability into other contexts, the research question to be answered in this paper is: “How is the MRCSSI in London, ON located in the Canadian migration and integration system?” This is getting answered through literature review, participation and observation at the agency, and expert interviews. The results show that the Canadian federal, provincial and local structures influence the work of the MRCSSI in very particular ways, enabling them in many practical aspects. However, concrete policies in this regard are rather rare and small organizations like the MRCSSI also have to overcome a number of challenges. The research and its outcomes are further contextualized through the theoretical concepts of Multiculturalism, Social Justice, and integration frameworks. In all, the aim of this paper is to look at the work of the MRCSSI from a system and policy point of view. It may help care providers in other countries to understand its setting and develop their own adaptions of the MRCSSI’s approach.

" } ["copyrightHolder"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> string(100) "Family Safety and Integration in Canada: A Community Based Approach and its Structural Preconditions" } ["locale"]=> string(5) "en_US" ["authors"]=> array(1) { [0]=> object(Author)#749 (6) { ["_data"]=> array(15) { ["id"]=> int(1783) ["email"]=> string(19) "noreply@ludovika.hu" ["includeInBrowse"]=> bool(true) ["publicationId"]=> int(1674) ["seq"]=> int(1) ["userGroupId"]=> int(235) ["country"]=> string(2) "HU" ["orcid"]=> string(0) "" ["url"]=> string(0) "" ["affiliation"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["biography"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["familyName"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(6) "Siemer" ["hu_HU"]=> string(6) "Siemer" } ["givenName"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(4) "Nina" ["hu_HU"]=> string(4) "Nina" } ["preferredPublicName"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["submissionLocale"]=> string(5) "en_US" } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) } } ["keywords"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> array(3) { [0]=> string(13) "Family Safety" [1]=> string(11) "Integration" [2]=> string(6) "Canada" } } ["subjects"]=> array(0) { } ["disciplines"]=> array(0) { } ["languages"]=> array(0) { } ["supportingAgencies"]=> array(0) { } ["galleys"]=> array(1) { [0]=> object(ArticleGalley)#762 (7) { ["_submissionFile"]=> NULL ["_data"]=> array(9) { ["submissionFileId"]=> int(5754) ["id"]=> int(872) ["isApproved"]=> bool(false) ["locale"]=> string(5) "en_US" ["label"]=> string(3) "PDF" ["publicationId"]=> int(1674) ["seq"]=> int(0) ["urlPath"]=> string(0) "" ["urlRemote"]=> string(0) "" } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(true) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) } } } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) }
PDF (English)
object(Publication)#117 (6) { ["_data"]=> array(25) { ["id"]=> int(1683) ["accessStatus"]=> int(0) ["datePublished"]=> string(10) "2017-12-31" ["lastModified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-07 11:31:00" ["sectionId"]=> int(34) ["seq"]=> int(2) ["submissionId"]=> int(1566) ["status"]=> int(3) ["version"]=> int(1) ["categoryIds"]=> array(0) { } ["copyrightYear"]=> int(2020) ["issueId"]=> int(112) ["licenseUrl"]=> string(49) "https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0" ["pages"]=> string(7) "21–73" ["abstract"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> string(462) "

This paper focuses on two developments in post-2010 Hungary’s legal framework accommodating, or rather targeting multiculturalism: first, the adoption of a new citizenship law, which opens the door for all ethnic kins and provides non-resident voting rights, and second, following the path of an earlier controversial legislation and rhetoric on multiculturalism, the reconceptualization of the Roma as a national (and not an ethnic) minority community.

" } ["copyrightHolder"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> string(40) "The Hungarian Model for Multiculturalism" } ["locale"]=> string(5) "en_US" ["authors"]=> array(1) { [0]=> object(Author)#735 (6) { ["_data"]=> array(15) { ["id"]=> int(1792) ["email"]=> string(19) "noreply@ludovika.hu" ["includeInBrowse"]=> bool(true) ["publicationId"]=> int(1683) ["seq"]=> int(2) ["userGroupId"]=> int(235) ["country"]=> string(2) "HU" ["orcid"]=> string(0) "" ["url"]=> string(0) "" ["affiliation"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["biography"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["familyName"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(7) "L. Papp" ["hu_HU"]=> string(7) "L. Papp" } ["givenName"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(7) "András" ["hu_HU"]=> string(7) "András" } ["preferredPublicName"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["submissionLocale"]=> string(5) "en_US" } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) } } ["keywords"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> array(3) { [0]=> string(9) "Hungarian" [1]=> string(16) "Multiculturalism" [2]=> string(4) "Roma" } } ["subjects"]=> array(0) { } ["disciplines"]=> array(0) { } ["languages"]=> array(0) { } ["supportingAgencies"]=> array(0) { } ["galleys"]=> array(1) { [0]=> object(ArticleGalley)#778 (7) { ["_submissionFile"]=> NULL ["_data"]=> array(9) { ["submissionFileId"]=> int(5769) ["id"]=> int(880) ["isApproved"]=> bool(false) ["locale"]=> string(5) "en_US" ["label"]=> string(3) "PDF" ["publicationId"]=> int(1683) ["seq"]=> int(0) ["urlPath"]=> string(0) "" ["urlRemote"]=> string(0) "" } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(true) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) } } } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) }
PDF (English)
object(Publication)#185 (6) { ["_data"]=> array(25) { ["id"]=> int(1685) ["accessStatus"]=> int(0) ["datePublished"]=> string(10) "2017-12-31" ["lastModified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-07 15:38:38" ["sectionId"]=> int(34) ["seq"]=> int(3) ["submissionId"]=> int(1568) ["status"]=> int(3) ["version"]=> int(1) ["categoryIds"]=> array(0) { } ["copyrightYear"]=> int(2020) ["issueId"]=> int(112) ["licenseUrl"]=> string(49) "https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0" ["pages"]=> string(7) "75–88" ["abstract"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> string(1255) "

I would like to begin my paper with a quotation from Anderson; he underlined that “nation was conceived in language and not in blood”.  Another argument, contrary to this line of reasoning says that the use of certain languages has only a practical value, languages being pure means of communication. However, I believe that history and contemporary happenings permanently prove that languages are definitely more than pure means of communication. Moreover, as Karl Deutsch expressed it very creatively, they work as a social glue, they define the members and borders of a community. But unfortunately, the idea of the Westphalian state was not realized and it strongly seems that it will never be realized. Thus, linguistic variety dominates the whole world; in 2000 there were 200 states with more than 6,000 languages. This linguistic diversity is useful and valuable if we look at it from the perspective of language ecology and if we consider that every language is the spine of a specific and unique culture. But it might cause difficulties for the state in communicating with its citizens, in treating them all in an equal manner (in a liberal paradigm and liberal state as Romania is) and in defining the character of the state itself.

" } ["copyrightHolder"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(40) "Acta Humana – Human Rights Publication" ["hu_HU"]=> string(41) "Acta Humana – Emberi Jogi Közlemények" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> string(102) "From Designing to Implementing Language Policies. A Case Study about the Hungarian Language in Romania" } ["locale"]=> string(5) "en_US" ["authors"]=> array(1) { [0]=> object(Author)#759 (6) { ["_data"]=> array(15) { ["id"]=> int(1794) ["email"]=> string(19) "noreply@ludovika.hu" ["includeInBrowse"]=> bool(true) ["publicationId"]=> int(1685) ["seq"]=> int(3) ["userGroupId"]=> int(235) ["country"]=> string(2) "HU" ["orcid"]=> string(0) "" ["url"]=> string(0) "" ["affiliation"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["biography"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["familyName"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(14) "Tóth-Batizán" ["hu_HU"]=> string(14) "Tóth-Batizán" } ["givenName"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(5) "Emese" ["hu_HU"]=> string(5) "Emese" } ["preferredPublicName"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["submissionLocale"]=> string(5) "en_US" } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) } } ["keywords"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> array(4) { [0]=> string(9) "Designing" [1]=> string(21) "Implementing Language" [2]=> string(18) "Hungarian Language" [3]=> string(7) "Romania" } } ["subjects"]=> array(0) { } ["disciplines"]=> array(0) { } ["languages"]=> array(0) { } ["supportingAgencies"]=> array(0) { } ["galleys"]=> array(1) { [0]=> object(ArticleGalley)#752 (7) { ["_submissionFile"]=> NULL ["_data"]=> array(9) { ["submissionFileId"]=> int(5773) ["id"]=> int(882) ["isApproved"]=> bool(false) ["locale"]=> string(5) "en_US" ["label"]=> string(3) "PDF" ["publicationId"]=> int(1685) ["seq"]=> int(0) ["urlPath"]=> string(0) "" ["urlRemote"]=> string(0) "" } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(true) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) } } } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) }
PDF (English)
object(Publication)#178 (6) { ["_data"]=> array(25) { ["id"]=> int(1687) ["accessStatus"]=> int(0) ["datePublished"]=> string(10) "2017-12-31" ["lastModified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-07 11:31:01" ["sectionId"]=> int(34) ["seq"]=> int(4) ["submissionId"]=> int(1570) ["status"]=> int(3) ["version"]=> int(1) ["categoryIds"]=> array(0) { } ["copyrightYear"]=> int(2020) ["issueId"]=> int(112) ["licenseUrl"]=> string(49) "https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0" ["pages"]=> string(8) "89–105" ["abstract"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> string(1007) "

The analysis of the Linguistic Landscape (LL) that has become a separate field of research focuses more and more on the living language and the relative real image created by the visual elements thereof in addition to the theoretical rationale and findings. With the examples found in Szatmárnémeti (Satu Mare) in the Partium region, this study is aimed at finding an answer to the manner in which the local and national public services approach the minority language users in a real, every day environment and to what extent they can be addressed in their native language. The multilingual inscriptions in public places are the indicators of the political, economic and social relations in a community as they are characterised by constant changes since they do not exist on their own but rather through their environment, politics and community. This makes the LL energetic, dynamic and plastic, being connected to the current political, social and economic networks by several connection points.

" } ["copyrightHolder"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> string(101) "Minorityhood in Szatmárnémeti/Satu Mare. Status Report on the Linguistic Landscape in a Border Town" } ["locale"]=> string(5) "en_US" ["authors"]=> array(1) { [0]=> object(Author)#786 (6) { ["_data"]=> array(15) { ["id"]=> int(1795) ["email"]=> string(19) "noreply@ludovika.hu" ["includeInBrowse"]=> bool(true) ["publicationId"]=> int(1687) ["seq"]=> int(4) ["userGroupId"]=> int(235) ["country"]=> string(2) "HU" ["orcid"]=> string(0) "" ["url"]=> string(0) "" ["affiliation"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["biography"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["familyName"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(12) "Weghofer-Vad" ["hu_HU"]=> string(12) "Weghofer-Vad" } ["givenName"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(11) "Erna Aletta" ["hu_HU"]=> string(11) "Erna Aletta" } ["preferredPublicName"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["submissionLocale"]=> string(5) "en_US" } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) } } ["keywords"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> array(3) { [0]=> string(12) "Minorityhood" [1]=> string(15) "Szatmárnémeti" [2]=> string(10) "Linguistic" } } ["subjects"]=> array(0) { } ["disciplines"]=> array(0) { } ["languages"]=> array(0) { } ["supportingAgencies"]=> array(0) { } ["galleys"]=> array(1) { [0]=> object(ArticleGalley)#763 (7) { ["_submissionFile"]=> NULL ["_data"]=> array(9) { ["submissionFileId"]=> int(5775) ["id"]=> int(883) ["isApproved"]=> bool(false) ["locale"]=> string(5) "en_US" ["label"]=> string(3) "PDF" ["publicationId"]=> int(1687) ["seq"]=> int(0) ["urlPath"]=> string(0) "" ["urlRemote"]=> string(0) "" } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(true) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) } } } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) }
PDF (English)
object(Publication)#112 (6) { ["_data"]=> array(25) { ["id"]=> int(1706) ["accessStatus"]=> int(0) ["datePublished"]=> string(10) "2017-12-31" ["lastModified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-08 07:54:56" ["sectionId"]=> int(37) ["seq"]=> int(6) ["submissionId"]=> int(1589) ["status"]=> int(3) ["version"]=> int(1) ["categoryIds"]=> array(0) { } ["copyrightYear"]=> int(2020) ["issueId"]=> int(112) ["licenseUrl"]=> string(49) "https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0" ["pages"]=> string(9) "117–122" ["copyrightHolder"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["subtitle"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> string(86) "Fighting Discrimination of EU Citizens Belonging to Minorities in the EU Member States" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> string(19) "European Parliament" } ["locale"]=> string(5) "en_US" ["authors"]=> array(0) { } ["keywords"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(19) "European Parliament" [1]=> string(14) "discrimination" } } ["subjects"]=> array(0) { } ["disciplines"]=> array(0) { } ["languages"]=> array(0) { } ["supportingAgencies"]=> array(0) { } ["galleys"]=> array(1) { [0]=> object(ArticleGalley)#784 (7) { ["_submissionFile"]=> NULL ["_data"]=> array(9) { ["submissionFileId"]=> int(5821) ["id"]=> int(903) ["isApproved"]=> bool(false) ["locale"]=> string(5) "en_US" ["label"]=> string(3) "PDF" ["publicationId"]=> int(1706) ["seq"]=> int(0) ["urlPath"]=> string(0) "" ["urlRemote"]=> string(0) "" } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(true) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) } } } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) }
PDF (English)
object(Publication)#790 (6) { ["_data"]=> array(25) { ["id"]=> int(1710) ["accessStatus"]=> int(0) ["datePublished"]=> string(10) "2017-12-31" ["lastModified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-08 07:56:26" ["sectionId"]=> int(37) ["seq"]=> int(7) ["submissionId"]=> int(1593) ["status"]=> int(3) ["version"]=> int(1) ["categoryIds"]=> array(0) { } ["copyrightYear"]=> int(2020) ["issueId"]=> int(112) ["licenseUrl"]=> string(49) "https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0" ["pages"]=> string(9) "123–157" ["copyrightHolder"]=> array(2) { ["en_US"]=> string(0) "" ["hu_HU"]=> string(0) "" } ["subtitle"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> string(60) "Council of Europe Congress of Local and Regional Authorities" } ["title"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> string(47) "Regional and Minority Languages in Europe Today" } ["locale"]=> string(5) "en_US" ["authors"]=> array(0) { } ["keywords"]=> array(1) { ["en_US"]=> array(3) { [0]=> string(18) "minority languages" [1]=> string(15) "Europe Congress" [2]=> string(20) "Regional Authorities" } } ["subjects"]=> array(0) { } ["disciplines"]=> array(0) { } ["languages"]=> array(0) { } ["supportingAgencies"]=> array(0) { } ["galleys"]=> array(1) { [0]=> object(ArticleGalley)#792 (7) { ["_submissionFile"]=> NULL ["_data"]=> array(9) { ["submissionFileId"]=> int(5827) ["id"]=> int(906) ["isApproved"]=> bool(false) ["locale"]=> string(5) "en_US" ["label"]=> string(3) "PDF" ["publicationId"]=> int(1710) ["seq"]=> int(0) ["urlPath"]=> string(0) "" ["urlRemote"]=> string(0) "" } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(true) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) } } } ["_hasLoadableAdapters"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataExtractionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_extractionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) ["_metadataInjectionAdapters"]=> array(0) { } ["_injectionAdaptersLoaded"]=> bool(false) }
PDF (English)